Stories about Design, Code & Productivity. (RSS)

Post Grotesk

Post Grotesk is a contemporary neo-grotesk typeface designed by Josh Flinkea under the guidance of Leah Hoffmitz.

Post Grotesk Weights

The development of Post Grotesk (originally Sonny Grotesque) began in the Spring of 2011 as a project to design a contemporary version of the traditional grotesque sans-serif. The intention was to build an amiable typeface with maximum usability and an overall sense of neutrality. Post Grotesk reduces the typical rigidness of a grotesk through subtle additions of personality and uniqueness.

Post Grotesk

It is available for purchase through the Village Incubator.

Onwards with Getting Architecture Done

Previously, all Getting Architecture Done (GAD) posts were directly posted here, on my blog.

After working on a newer version of the site, GAD has now its own blog—accesible online at gettingarchitecturedone.com/writing.

Articles will be posted in English and, hopefully, also in Spanish—and will be referenced here every now and then.

Also, articles are now tagged with categories, so it is easier to navigate through content you like. For instance, you can check articles tagged with scripting, efficiency, or parametric.

Updates will be shared via Twitter, Facebook, Google+, RSS, and on our mailing list—so you don’t miss anything.

The Man Who Sent The First Tweet

After giving some space to Evan Williams and Dick Costolo, Jack Dorsey has returned to Twitter as CEO. He is—as said by The New York Times—the man who sent the first tweet:

As the man who sent the first tweet in 2006 and a product visionary who led the company in its early years, Mr. Dorsey helped make the micromessaging service into a global platform that now has more than 300 million active users, from celebrities like President Obama and Katy Perry whose tweets are followed by millions to ordinary people with just a few dozen followers.

[…]

Mr. Dorsey was the driving force for many of Twitter’s product innovations during that time, like the ability to embed tweets on other sites, but was also a polarizing figure, firing product managers and fostering an atmosphere of secrecy and paranoia, according to current and former associates.

Read the whole story

Useful Laravel Dependencies

Laravel is a powerful PHP framework. Like many other PHP systems, it benefits from the use of Composer to manage its dependencies, making the use of open-source libraries extremely simple.

What follows is a list of the packages (or dependencies) I am using in most of my current projects—let me explain you why.

dimsav/laravel-translatable

A package I discovered a few weeks ago. It gives your Laravel app the possibility of adding translations for your SQL tables to various different languages, with a really flexible structure. You can, for instance, have the articles in your blog written in English by default, and only translate to certain languages the ones you want.

Then, you can show those translated languages for users that have selected that locale on their browser, but fallback to the default language if an article is not available in their language.

Check it on Github.

jenssegers/laravel-date

A package based in Carbon. It makes ridiculously simple working with dates, with support for all languages.

Some of the features I use the most are: parsing database dates to human-readable ones (2015-06-14 could be translated to Sunday 14, June 2015); expressing how long ago a content was created (posted 2 minutes ago, for instance); calculating dates in the past or in the future, by adding or substracting days, weeks, months (or whatever unit) to a date object.

Possibilities are unlimited, and this library makes it even easier that before.

Check it on Github.

rtconner/laravel-tagging

With this package, you can use the Taggable trait to any of your models, and start tagging them. Then, you can use the query builder with its own methods to filter your content depending on tags.

I have been using it for articles and projects, to organize content and allow users to navigate by article categories.

Check it on Github.

panique/laravel-sass

If you are designing with SCSS, you need a parser o automate the generation of your CSS files. This package does the job for me pretty well.

It allows you to run inline PHP functions specifying what SCSS folder to parse, and where to save the CSS. Also, it has an in-built function to minify your CSS files, compressing them a lot, so you don’t have to worry about it.

For development purposes, I tend to set a GET variable on the App::before() filter function (located on app/filters.php) to force generate new CSS files. Running the URL /home/?scss=1, for instance, would regenerate all my CSS files.

Check it on Github

vtalbot/markdown

Based on Michelf’s PHP parser, this package implements methods to parse Markdown text from strings or files directly.

One example would be calling Markdown::string($string) in your code to parse the $string from markdown to HTML.

Check it on Github

If you know other PHP packages that I should know of, please drop me a tweet! Thanks for reading.

Godin On Mood And Reality

The simple shortcut: the way we respond to the things that we can't change can instantly transform our lives. "That's interesting," is a thousand times more productive than, "that's terrible." Even more powerful is our ability to stop experiencing failure before it even happens, because, of course, it usually doesn't.

Happiness, for most of us, is a choice. Reality is not. It seems, though, that choosing to be happy ends up changing the reality that we keep track of.

The way you see the world—and the way you deal with things—is often more important than what is actually happening out there.