NOVEMBER 5, 2017

Earlier this month, we visited San Francisco. Before getting there, I created an illustration with Croquetilla as an Alcatraz prisoner (and placed it on a montage as a fugitive, and on a Wanted ad). Last week's update of the Croquetilla Stickers for iMessage includes this and other new illustrations.

Croquetilla escaping Alcatraz Island.

Alcatraz's high-security prision remained open from 1934 to 1963. Apparently, it still remains a mystery wether the three only prisioners that ever managed to escape Alcatraz's high-security prision actually made it to firm land or if drowned in the water.

Croquetilla Wanted ad.

You can Download the Croquetilla Stickers for iMessage.

Happy Birthday Croquetilla!

APRIL 22, 2017

Logo for Lourdes Alonso

First results of an on-going project to create a new visual identity for www.Lourdes.ac. I'm now trying to get away from it to resemble caligraphy books, and make it more like her artist signature.

This shot was posted on Dribbble.

FEBRUARY 18, 2016

A set of daily items I use everyday.

Here are my Adidas Stan Smith.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2015

In a quest to keep learning and improving my design skills, I force myself to regularly practice design of graphics, sketches, art, typography, lettering, and other design-related stuff.

A side-project that arose from this deliberate design approach is The People Project—which has the sole objective of depicting people in their everyday life in extremely simple ways.

What you can see next is a small compilation of designs of the series produced between 2008 and 2015. I am preparing screen prints of this series and have an email list for those of you who want to keep track of the project. If that’s the case, join here.

Structures, 2009.

Structures

1402 — 2014.

141108 — Patterns, 2014.

People Pattern

150420 — London Napkin, 2015.

People in a napkin

150408 — Her, 2015.

People Her People Her Many

140408 — Don’t Worry, It's Just Some Random People, 2015.

Don’t Worry, It's Just Some Random People

150403 — Them, 2015.

People Girls People Multicultural People Multiple

SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

My last shot on Dribbble. Playing with Grasshopper 3D. This is a plan view of a tornado-like curve generated using the sine and cosine functions.

AUGUST 3, 2015

Posted a while ago on Dribbble, I was just having some fun with Grasshopper and Illustrator.

I started doing an M letter with the sin function, then repeated multiple times to obtain this result. Check out my other designs on Dribbble.

OCTOBER 8, 2014

Type, Apps & Calendar

This post has three Dribbble shots that I have done over the last year in my Volant Moleskine. This first one has some type sketches, some early design ideas of Everfocus, and an idea for a Weekly Tasks calendar that I did later on.

Type Sketches

Type Sketches

Here are some sketches I did with two different thicknesses of the Staedtler Pigment Liner—0.05 and 0.4 mm— without any fixed purpose. Just deliberate practice.

Shapes & Notes

Shapes & Notes

Some more sketches. These ones are from a while ago, around June 18, 2014. This last shot was originally posted on Dribbble as a rebound of Custom Type, with some geometric shapes and annotations.

JULY 30, 2014

Artwork extracted from an architecture design iteration, part of my architecture degree's final project, which I submitted last June.

The result was obtained from a parametric model created with Grasshopper, transformed in a two-dimensional drawing with Rhino, and then formatted with Adobe Illustrator.

Dribbble

JUNE 24, 2014

Last February, I shared my Compression design on Dribbble. The following screenshots illustrate the steps to generate the geometry. The curves were made using Rhino 5 and Grasshopper.

The whole design is parametric, as the geometry is based in modifiable parameters which can be altered after the design is finished to adjust the final result.

The parameters here are four lines, which can be moved in Rhino, rotated or scaled, and are referenced into the Grasshopper definition.

Then, the lines are subdivided in equidistant segments, with a parameter of the number of points. In this case, there are 76 segments on each line.

Using the Interpolate Curve component, the subdividing points are joined with spline curves.

Now, a surface created in Rhino is referenced in Grasshopper, which will act as our canvas, trimming the outer segments of the curves.

With the component Project, the curves are projected on the surface, and the outer segments disappear.

Now that the parametric definition is finished, we can adjust the initial parameters. This is, the initial lines and the amount of segments on each of them.

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